4 Bad Things You Didn’t Know About Sugar

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As if sugar wasn’t demonized enough in general, there are hidden terrors about sugar that you were never aware of. Sugar is ostracized, and rightly so—it’s incredibly unhealthy. Many alternatives are also bad for you, like artificial sweeteners and wrongly imported sweeteners, but processed sugar should be eliminated from your diet on the whole. Everyone knows that sugar can cause weight gain and increase fatty deposits on the body, but the real dangers of sugar lurk behind these more obvious predicaments, tucked safely out of sight. Here are four shocking and horrifying things that you never knew about the way sugar impacts your body.

Sugar can cause liver damage.

Unlike alcohol or abused medications, sugar doesn’t start with the kidneys. It goes straight to the liver and begins its rampant destruction. The fructose of sugar is what assaults this essential bodily organ. While the word fructose sounds incredibly similar to the necessary glucose, the two are certainly not the same. Fructose can only be metabolized by the liver, which makes it an unnecessary liability.

Liver damage illustration

Sugar has the potential to cause cancer.

Despite how clickbait-y that sentence sounds, the truth is out there. Cancer happens to be in the top five for leading causes of death around the world, and insulin stimulates the massive growth of cancerous cells. High insulin levels are caused by excessive sugar consumption, which can dramatically increase your odds of developing cancer.

Sugar increases cholesterol, not fat.

Scientists and nutritionists alike have been blaming high cholesterol on fatty foods, but the fact of the matter is, nothing impacts cholesterol quite like sugar intake. High cholesterol is what causes heart disease, which is currently besting cancer regarding death-toll, and it can even lead to heart attacks and strokes. Sugar raises the triglycerides and LDLs, which are the number one causes for heart disease.

cholesterol

Sugar creates insulin resistance.

Despite the average person thinking sugar and insulin are the same things, the fundamental differences between the two are imperative to health. Insulin is a hormone that circulates throughout the body, enabling glucose to encourage cellular health and metabolization. When you eat too much sugar, your body produces too much insulin, and it, therefore, becomes immune to its impact. This sugar-caused insulin resistance can lead to blindness, diabetes, and cardiovascular damages.

pancreas insulin

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